Grading Rubric

Tue, 2012-04-24 00:40 -- batch_migrate

Grading Rubric

GRADING RUBRIC FOR ENGL 1100, 1110, AND 1120

The following grading rubric is organized according to the following four major criteria, any of which the instructor may choose to emphasize according to the nature of the writing assignment: 1) content and reasoning, 2) organization, 3) sentence structure and diction, 4) mechanics (usage, punctuation, spelling). In interpreting the rubric, the student should realize that a significant variation from any one of the criteria may lower or raise the grade that the essay receives.

THE "A" ESSAY (OUTSTANDING)

  1. The central idea is significant and/or insightful, clearly defined, and supported by concrete and consistently relevant examples. Reasoning is persuasive and valid and demonstrates an awareness of the complexities of the subject. If secondary sources are used, they are integrated into the essay effectively.
  2. The essay's organization is well chosen and consistently fulfilled. Paragraphs are unified, coherent, and well developed. Transitions are smooth, precise, logical, and appropriate.
  3. Sentences are syntactically superior, demonstrating an awareness of stylistic variations and sophistication. Diction is not only precise and idiomatic, but it is also fresh, original, engaging, and thought-provoking.
  4. Mechanically, the essay is almost free of errors in usage, punctuation, and spelling. Documentation, if used, is correct.

THE "B" ESSAY (STRONG)

  1. The central idea is clearly defined and supported by appropriate and adequate details and examples. Reasoning is valid and consistent. If secondary sources are used, they are integrated into the essay effectively.
  2. The essay's organization is clear and controlled. Paragraphs are unified and coherent, though perhaps slightly underdeveloped. Transitions are effective, but some may be weak or mechanical.
  3. Sentences are well constructed, demonstrating some awareness of stylistic variations and sophistication. Diction is precise, idiomatic, and occasionally advanced in its range.
  4. Mechanically, the essay contains some errors in usage, punctuation, and/or spelling, but it contains few (if any) errors that obscure communication or weaken clarity. Documentation, if used, is correct.

THE "C" ESSAY (ADEQUATE)

  1. The central idea is apparent, but it may be trivial or too general. Support for the central idea is adequate but occasionally repetitious, vague, or sketchy. The reasoning is valid, though perhaps containing a minor flaw in logic. If secondary sources are used, some may be inappropriately used or ineffectively integrated into the essay.
  2. The essay's organization is appropriately chosen though not consistently fulfilled. Paragraphs are unified and coherent, though occasionally underdeveloped. Transitions are clear but perhaps mechanical or monotonous.
  3. Sentences are generally lacking in variety and/or conciseness, demonstrating little awareness of stylistic options. Diction is generally idiomatic and clear, though occasionally imprecise.
  4. Mechanically, the essay is generally correct, though it may contain some errors in usage, punctuation, and/or spelling. Documentation, if used, is generally correct, containing only a few minor errors.

THE "D" ESSAY (LIMITED)

  1. The central idea is confusing, contradictory, and/or unclear. Support for the central idea is underdeveloped, irrelevant, or redundant. Reasoning is flawed. If secondary sources are used, they are poorly documented and ineffectively or illogically placed within the essay.
  2. The essay's organization is inconsistent or illogical. Paragraphs are incoherent and/or underdeveloped. Transitions are ineffective and/or unclear.
  3. Sentences are incoherent, incomplete, or monotonous, demonstrating a very limited range of stylistic options. Diction is inappropriate and vague.
  4. The essay contains numerous errors in usage, punctuation, and/or spelling. Documentation, if used, contains several errors.

THE "F" ESSAY (FUNDAMENTALLY DEFICIENT)

  1. The central idea is unclear or not apparent. Support for the central idea is seriously underdeveloped, irrelevant, or entirely absent. Reasoning is deeply flawed. If secondary sources are to be used, they are absent, misused, or plagiarized.
  2. The essay's organization is confusing or unintentionally chaotic. Paragraphs are seriously underdeveloped and/or transitions nonexistent.
  3. Sentences are seriously flawed, muddled and/or incomplete. Diction is inappropriate and/or vague, often obscuring clear communication.
  4. The number and seriousness of errors in usage, punctuation, spelling, diction, syntax, and/or documentation are highly distracting, obstructing communication.