Career office help students plan for the future

Fri, 2012-07-27 09:24 -- univcomm
Now, more than ever, college freshman are coming in to school planning for their future after graduation rather than waiting until their senior year. Today’s economy places an even greater importance on the investment in a college education. According to Jo DuMontelle, director of Career Resources at Anderson University, students coming in to college are being encouraged to attend college and make a career choice sooner rather than later by parents. “Parents are telling their children not to wait, to plan now.”

Most students do know what they want to do, but even for those who haven’t decided, the Career Resource Center is there to guide them through the process through many avenues such as career and personality testing, resume writing and interview skills and plenty of reference materials for many of the careers students are interested in today.

“I think our idea is that their freshman year students take a formal career class that helps them make decisions, not just about what jobs are in what majors,” said DuMontelle. “That’s just a small part of career development planning. It’s also about what are their strengths and weaknesses, who they are and what has God called them to do.”

DuMontelle also points out that students need to feel comfortable about the journey process of choosing a major. She encourages students to test it out and take classes in their field of interest, then to gain some actual experience, such as internships and volunteering, as part of their decision making on a particular career.

“Students need a resume with volunteer and actual working experience on it. In the past it wasn’t an issue, but now it is because of the economy,” said DuMontelle. “It’s not just finding a job but building relationships.”

DuMontelle says that their office uses the right balance of technology, such as online services and www.IndianaINTERN.net, to help students sleuth out information on those careers they are interested in finding information. “We’re the clearinghouse to help students use tools. I tell them don’t limit their choices.”

Anderson University is a private, Christian liberal arts institution of approximately 2,700 undergraduate and graduate students. Established in 1917 by the Church of God, the university offers more than 60 undergraduate majors and graduate programs of study in business, nursing, and theology.