For schools of theology, its time to bend tradition

Tue, 2012-05-15 10:37 -- univcomm
May 15, 2012

Much talk and energy have been devoted lately to discerning the "future of the seminary" in North America. That future is uncertain, with many theological institutions facing financial difficulties and steadily declining enrollments. The larger challenge, however, may be cultural. If seminaries hope to survive, they will have to adapt to a changing world.

stained-glassTwo years ago, David Sebastian, dean of the School of Theology at Anderson University, reported five trends shaping the future of theological education in North America. They are: a widening chasm between Christian churches and seminaries; increasing numbers of seminary students who have not grown up in the church; a growing awareness that seminary education is inaccessible for many potential seminary students; an increased questioning of whether seminary is really worth the financial costs; and forthcoming population shifts that will affect the ability of seminaries to prepare culturally competent leaders for the 21st century.

Those trends, in addition to declining membership in some American churches, suggest that there is a need for theological schools to rethink their role in theological training in order to remain financially self-sustaining and to train leaders for an increasingly global church. Their problem is not that they need to retain their place in the academy, but rather that they need to justify their existence to Christian churches, which are becoming more ethnically diverse.

Read the full article by Katherine M. Douglass and Jason Bruner in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Image by Julie Delton for The Chronicle.

The Anderson University School of Theology is the seminary of the Church of God (Anderson, Indiana). Established in 1950, the seminary is fully accredited by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS) and the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The seminary offers a number of degree programs, including the Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.), the Master of Divinity (M.Div.), the Master of Theological Studies (M.T.S.), the Master of Arts in Intercultural Service (M.A.I.S.), and the Online Master of Arts in Christian Ministry (M.A.C.M.).