Music business student interns in Nashville

Wed, 2012-08-08 08:57 -- univcomm
August 8, 2012

His dream of working in artist management became a reality this summer for junior marketing major Kurtis Dickerson. With a music business concentration, the Anderson University student pursued his goal by writing for a prominent music review website and interning at a small booking agency in Nashville. Both experiences have brought Dickerson closer to what he wants to do with his career.

Dickerson wrote for Stereo Subversion, an advocate for new music, films, and art relevant to culture. Stereo Subversion exists to shed light on great artists regardless of genre or popularity, serving as an outlet for artists making a difference and getting the word out about what they are doing. Stereo Subversion helps people connect with the artists that are doing great work off and under the radar, as well as those artists who are well known.

“I first started writing a blog about campus life, friends, and shows that were going on here,” said Dickerson. “I realized that I enjoy it and I wanted to do more writing.”

Dickerson contacted Matthew Conner, friend and writer for Stereo Subversion, to ask about being an addition to the team. “Matt told me yes,” said Dickerson. “I write and give opinion on new albums and give readers details on what the album brings to the table.”

Along with this new writing opportunity, Dickerson interned this summer with Current Talent Agency, a small booking agency located in Franklin, Tenn., a suburb of Nashville. “Current manages bands like Gungor, All Sons and Daughters, and Mike Mains and the Branches,” said Dickerson. “I get the opportunity to work alongside three others as the office intern, calling venues and booking shows.”

Dickerson gained valuable skills at AU as the vice president of business affairs of Orangehaus Records and supervisor of the booking agency for Orangehaus Entertainment.

“Our teaching philosophy for music business is very entrepreneurial, and music business classes are experiential,” said Becky Chappell, director of music business studies at AU and advisor to Orangehaus. “Also, Orangehaus Records gives real world experience in selecting, recording, and marketing an artist.”

Chappell has worked closely with Dickerson and his plans for the summer. “I told him to figure out how to make every business the music business,” said Chappell. “Kurtis is a highly motivated music business student who has developed an incredible understanding of the industry. I sincerely believe that he will be very successful in whatever he does and possibly pioneer new business models to empower independent artists. The economic environment of today's music business is often referred to as the ‘wild, wild west,’ making Kurtis a rhinestone cowboy to be reckoned with.”

— Kayla Meid is a junior from Indianapolis, Ind., majoring in communication arts and theatre arts. Meid is an associate of Fifth Street Communications, writing on behalf of the Anderson University Office of University Communications.

Anderson University is a private Christian university of 2,600 undergraduate and graduate students in central Indiana. Anderson University continues to be recognized as one of America's top colleges by U.S. News and World Report, The Princeton Review, and Forbes. Established in 1917 by the Church of God, Anderson University offers more than 65 undergraduate majors and graduate programs in business, music, nursing, and theology.